Feldenkrais blog and free lessons excerpts

Free the neck…lose the millstone! 29/6/17

So, where do you reckon my neck begins…?

For most of us, when we think of the neck, it’s only from the top of the shoulders upwards to the base of the head. But actually, the neck is just the top part of your spine. If it didn’t have a separate name then we might think of it differently.

Begin at the coccyx, the base of the spine: between your buttocks, and feel your way up your back, one vertebrae at a time until you reach your head.

Does how you sense your neck change if you alter the concept of where it starts?  Explore rolling the head between the hands in this week’s lesson, and find your inner giraffe…

 

Ps – I’m now working more closely with a Feldenkrais colleague, Emma Alter, who kindly wrote this week’s blog.   Emma, who is also a musician, teaches a class at Waterloo on Tuesday evenings.   Click here for her website.

Please sign-up to our new joint Meet-up page – Feldenkrais in London to help spread the word.   The more people sign up the more coverage it gets, and if you are coming to a class do RSVP on the page. Many thanks!

 

Why is back pain so common? 12/5/17  

…its not just the spreadsheet that hurts.

When you bend forward, the muscles at the front contract and shorten while those in your back release and lengthen.  To arch the spine (the opposite movement),  the back muscles contract and the muscles at the front lengthen.

The strength of muscles is important.  But it is not the only thing that matters.

To optimise movement and alleviate pain, it’s important to learn how to release as well as contract muscles.

If you habitually contract on both sides of you at same time, it can become a painful tug-of-war between your own muscles.  Let go, and release your back with this week’s lesson.

 

Do the two ends of your back know each other? 28/4/17

The back, our current focus in class, is a feat of engineering.  The relationships between the 33 vertebrae, ribs and shoulder blades give scope for enormous variety of movement.  And, the back functions well when the parts work in concert.    

When we move one end of the spine it has a significant impact on the other end. Due to the distance between the two ends this isn’t always evident.  Over time, if our perception is different to reality this can impair function and cause pain.

Explore the relationship in this lesson between the two ends of the back.  

How does your’s stack up?

 

Why are the hamstrings such a big deal? 23/3/17

Straightening the leg and touching the toes seems to be something that we like to try and do – no matter if it hurts.  Try this week’s lesson – for a Feldenkrais take on this stretch.

 

 

The movements engage the skeleton all the way from the crown of the head, along the spine and down to our toes.  It’s more about the nervous system learning how to connect these different parts of us, than elongating one muscle.
And how might this help with everyday action?  Do you feel more grounded? Does your spine support your head better?  Has your peripheral vision changed?

 

Where is your ‘I’? Taking a look at our diagonals, 17/3/17

In daily activity, like walking, we transmit force diagonally across ourselves.  This week’s lesson, click below, explores this. The two diagonals (from the left hand above our head to the right foot and vice-versa) intersect somewhere in our lower trunk.  We might term this point our ‘centre’.

 

Yet for many of us the point that feels most like ‘I’ is between the eyebrows, or around the chest area.  Why the discrepancy?  And does it matter?

Try for yourself: the next time you walk, note what difference it makes to sense your centre as near the navel, and then between your eyebrows.

Connecting you to…all of you, 10/3/17

Its all connected…the theme of our current lessons is linking our extremities to the centre

It’s easy to compartmentalise ourselves: the shoulders, the head and so on.   The feet, say, may feel some way from the centre of us (wherever we consider that to be). They may feel so distant that they feel like ‘my feet’, rather than part of an integrated ‘me’.   That can cause problems.

 

Toes can have a big impact on our pelvis, spine, and head. And Feldenkrais is great at linking up the distal (‘distant’) and proximal (‘near’) parts of the skeleton to improve self-use.  Try this week’s lesson and explore the relationship of the feet to the rest of us.

 

Ps – Apologies for the hiatus in posting this blog –  my time has been taken up by joining a new clinic in Shoreditch at Scrutton St, and I’m now teaching individual lessons from there.   Do get in touch, if you might be interested in these.

How relaxed are your shoulders? 12/1/17

So, where exactly are my shoulders?

The shoulders, our current theme, can be a bit of mystery – how do they work? Listen to this week’s lesson.  They are often a challenge, and laptops and phones often don’t help.  The Feldenkrais method teaches us how to use our skeleton, to hold our bodies against the force of gravity.

 

Part of this process it to understand when we needn’t use our muscles to do this, to prevent them becoming tense and strained.   Many muscles we use for postural (‘or anti-gravity’ purposes) are better used helping us move through space.

So…how do your shoulders hang on your skeleton?

Have a good Rest this Christmas! 24/12/16

Rests are key in Feldenkrais.  During group lessons these are frequent and short.  It’s an integral part of not straining: knowing when a break will enhance what you’re doing, and then resting.

I’ve not been able to post for two weeks and it’s hard to accept you can’t do what you plan to.  It’s that reluctance to stop that encourages us to push a little further or longer in a movement, which might lead to discomfort.

Here are two lessons this week: moving the head…via the feet

 

and exploring our breath

 

Have a rest this Christmas, and Happy New Year!

 

Noticing is more important than the movement itself, Week 11, 2/12/16

In Feldenkrais, noticing movements and staying comfortable (the process) are much more important than completing or perfecting the movements (an end goal).

Try this week’s lesson:

 

It features a bass line – the ‘Bell Hand’.  It’s a fascinating pulsing of fingers and thumb which both calms and alerts us to when we are straining.  The melody is straightforward movements which we’ll likely do every day.  But how easy it is to do them without straining?

As Feldenkrais said:

Movement is life. Life is a process. Improve the quality of the process and you improve the quality of life itself.

Releasing tension in the hands can relax us through our whole self

Releasing tension in the hands can relax us through our whole self

Apologies – recording not so good this week…you have to turn up the volume a bit.

Visualization and Movement, Week 10, 25/11/6

Feldenkrais was a French-trained physicist and pioneer of judo in Europe.  Drawing on these two bodies of knowledge and cultures, his method emerged as a blend of both.  Visualisation of movement, used for centuries in martial arts, was one approach he popularized in the West.

By imagining a movement we’re not held back by normal muscular and environmental constraints, and we can improve further.

Try this week’s lesson, including a short visualization.

 

Or, instead, try to visualize an everyday movement.  Can you sense a kinesthetic feeling as you imagine?  Can you feel the connection between your mind and your body?

day dreaming or imagining a better movement?

day dreaming or imagining a better movement?

Do you notice your feet?, Week 9, 18/11/16

The feet have quite a job to do.

Receiving sensory input from the ground they make slight adjustments to allow us to balance.    Depending on the positions of our head, spine pelvis etc. they also have to adjust to the particular way we hold our skeleton.

Each foot has 33 joints.  There is potential for a wide variety of movement, and opportunity to optimise their function.    Try this week’s lesson to explore some of that variety.

 

And, if you better understand how your feet stand underneath you, does that draw your attention to where you might improve self-use higher up?

Feat of nature

Feat of nature

You don’t always have to move to learn how to improve movement, Week 8, 11/11/16

In some lessons students lie or move entirely on one side, like this week’s lesson.   Try it here.

 

Its counter-intuitive.  If we are asymmetrical – say one shoulder is lower than the other – this can have a negative effect.   In this example, the rib cage may not expand fully on one side, impairing breathing.

Feldenkrais realised that once a movement pattern on one side is clarified in the nervous system, it can quickly be replicated on the other side.  To improve function it’s not necessarily muscles that need to move, rather our nervous system needs to learn how to move them.  

New Class: 9am Saturdays, Castle Climbing Centre, N4 2HA

New Class: 9am Saturdays, Castle Climbing Centre, N4 2HA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Balance for everyday life, Week 7, 20/10/16

Balance – the theme of the next six lessons –  is key to optimising the use of our skeleton and muscles.  Try this week’s lesson excerpt:

 

Feldenkrais was one of the early pioneers of Judo in Europe.  He learnt how dynamic equilibrium – and an ability to readily change direction – enabled judo masters to excel.  They had a pre-eminent understanding of how best to use gravity and themselves to succeed.


What if we could use that knowledge in everyday life, for movements like walking, typing, or playing a musical instrument?  That’s the core of the Feldenkrais Method – a kind of martial (or movement) art for everyday life.

Dynamic equilibrium in everyday life

Dynamic equilibrium in everyday life

Self-exploration, Week 6, 13/10/16

Before discovering Feldenkrais, I’d enjoyed movement classes – but felt I was trying to live up to a standard which my tall, often desk-bound body was unable to attain.  The teacher’s demonstrations just looked too good, echoing my experience of gym at school.
In Feldenkrais the teacher almost never demonstrates, and I could explore movement much more at my own pace.  I judged myself less and was no longer constrained by what I thought I could and couldn’t do.  The movements became my own, and I began to take responsibility for them: a joy to be freed from someone else’s standard.    Try this week’s lesson:

 

New Class, 9.30am Fridays, Clissold House - a lovely venue!

New Class, 9.30am Fridays, Clissold House – a lovely venue!

 

The Elusive Obvious, Week 5, 7/10/16

The principle movement of this week’s lesson – arching and rounding the spine – is well known.

 

So how can the Feldenkrais method bring something new to it?

Feldenkrais talked about the ‘Elusive Obvious’ – that in everyday movements we become so used to what we do that our own habits become very difficult for us to recognise.  Rounded shoulders, say, may be obvious to anyone who watches us – but not to ourselves.

So, by revisiting movements slowly and precisely, by introducing constraints which pinpoint a part of the movement – the elusive can become obvious.  And then you have options for change.

 

Moving our whole selves, Week 4, 29/9/16

In Feldenkrais we aim to optimise the use of our whole selves in movement.  

With a bad knee, say, the pain may be caused by your use of another part of you.  The knee is a simple-ish hinge joint, and taken on its own there’s not too much to go wrong.  But think how much higher up your body – the position of the pelvis, the ribs, the head etc. – can affect the force through your knee.  

To help your knee you’d need to address the whole picture.   Try this week’s lesson.

 

How much of you moves when you move your heel?

ps – new class begins this week – Clissold House in the park, 9.30am every Friday

 

Are you sitting comfortably? Week 3, 22/9/16

The position of the pelvis has a big impact on sitting. Try this week’s lesson excerpt.

 

Move the pelvis and the spine also moves – tilting the pelvis backwards or forwards often has a direct impact on the openness of our chest and shoulders.

Feel your sitting bones (at the bottom of the pelvis) take your weight as you sit down.  Tilt your pelvis backwards and forwards a little – does this change the position of your spine, chest and head?   Try again after a while – has the comfortable position of your pelvis changed, and how responsive is your head now?  

 

Finding the easy way, Week 2, 15/19/16

Finding the easy way is key to Feldenkrais: not struggling and staying comfortable.  Muscles tense when we ‘try hard’, and we need to release as well as contract muscles to move effectively.  To learn, movement patterns included, it helps to be relaxed.

But that is much easier said than done.  Pushing ourselves, stretching to the limit, trying hard even if it hurts are deeply ingrained in our sense of what is right and proper in exercise (and other facets of life).

The next time you catch yourself straining in movement, stop for a moment.  Is there an easier way?

Here is this week’s lesson excerpt:

 

 

Releasing the pelvis and hips, Week 1, 9/9/16

My new Feldenkrais mini-blog/podcast: 100 words and 20-minute lesson excerpt (from my weekly group lesson).

 

Our current theme is ‘releasing the pelvis and hips’.  The pelvis is central to how we move and who we are. The hip joints relate very closely to it. But the term ‘hip’ is imprecise and often refers to the upper protruding part of the pelvis, ignoring the rest, never mind the hip joints.  By understanding where our bones are and how they work, we can move in a more effective and pleasurable way.

Where is your pelvis? When do you move your hip joints?

hip-and-pelvis